Woodhaven Place

Your Neighborhood Farm

A Simple Chicken Door

For the past several weeks, we have had the older chickens living in the new coop. The coop consists of an eight foot by eight foot plastic shed that we bought from Home Depot. The shed has worked great. We have made many additions, but we will cover those later. This weekend we finally finished the chickens run, and that meant it was time to make a door in the back of the coop so they could access the run.

We decided to keep it as simple as possible, we have grand plans of installing an automatic chicken door opener later this year. From what we have researched it is important that the door be just big enough for the chickens to get in and out. In addition, the door needs to pass the bottom of the hole leading to the outside when it is closed or little-handed critters such as raccoons will pry it open.

Chicken Door  Chicken Door 2

We were lucky and as usual we were able to scrounge most of the materials from around the homestead. We started with a piece of plastic wall sheeting. It is the stuff they panel bathtub surrounds with. Our hope is that this will keep everything dry, and it will not require painting. The sheeting is nothing more than heavy plastic, so we backed it with a piece of half-inch plywood. We used some small brass nails that came out of a weather stripping kit, to attach the plastic to the plywood. As you can see from the pictures, the plastic is wider than the plywood. The idea behind this was to create a slide on each side of the door that can ride in a wooden track.

Door Rails  Door On Rails
Next we used the table saw to create a one-quarter inch deep by an inch and a half wide shelf along our side pieces. These will act as our rails for the door to slide up and down along. The rails are four inches longer than twice the height of the door. Our doors dimensions ended up being eighteen inches tall by ten inches wide. The plastic is very smooth.  With the pressure treated lumber on one side, and the plastic wall of the shed on the other the door slides very easily.

Door In PlaceAfter we had cut the hole in the back of the barn, we mounted our rails. To mount the rails, we simply used some exterior wood screws with some washers. We made sure the rails were plum and parallel and drove the screws in from the outside of the barn. This made a very easy and sturdy track system for the door to ride in. The last step to complete the door was to add an eye bolt to the top for our rope to attach to.

We were quite proud of the pulley setup. Using some small pulleys from the hardware store and some four inch by one-quarter inch bolts we were able to create a mounting point that is held far enough from the wall that nothing rubs. Next we simply had to run the rope up the wall across the ceiling and out a small hole in the front of the barn. Another pulley was set up to redirect the rope down to a height where one of the little helpers could operate the door. The door is very simple to operate. There are two loops in the rope. The loop at the end of the rope lowers the door to the closed position and the second loop up fully opens the door. It was convenient that the handle on the barn doubles as a place to loop the rope around.

Pully System Pully System 2 Pully System 3 Rope Handle
We have lots of plans for our little chicken house and would love to hear your thoughts and ideas. We hope you enjoyed reading about our little chicken house as much as we enjoyed working on it.

1 Comment

  1. Brilliant door design! I may try to adapt it to work for our coop. It’s been quite a pain to go into their pen to shut it all the time.

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